<div dir="ltr"><div>I recently came across an interesting paper:</div><div><br></div><div>"This paper presents Vuvuzela, a system that provides </div><div>scalable private point-to-point text messaging. </div><div>Vuvuzela ensures that no adversary will learn </div><div>which pairs of users are communicating, </div><div>as long as just one out of N servers is not compromised,<br>even for users who continue to use Vuvuzela for years.</div><div>...</div><div>Vuvuzela‚Äôs design assumes an adversary that controls all but<br>one of the Vuvuzela servers (users need not know which one),<br>controls an arbitrary number of clients, and can monitor, block,<br>delay, or inject traffic on any network link. Two users, Alice<br>and Bob, communicating through Vuvuzela should have their<br>communication protected if their two clients, and any one<br>server, are uncompromised."</div><div><br></div><div>I don't see how this wouldn't be of interest here...</div><div><br></div><div>Anyone qualified to evaluate their claims care </div><div>to comment? </div><div><br></div><div>-carlo</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Link to the paper:</div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://jelle.vandenhooff.name/vuvuzela.pdf">http://jelle.vandenhooff.name/vuvuzela.pdf</a></div><div><div><br></div><div>Authors:</div><div><br></div><div>Jelle van den Hooff, </div><div>David Lazar, </div><div>Matei Zaharia, </div><div>Nickolai Zeldovich<br></div></div></div>